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May
24

Student training dig in Grosvenor Park, Chester

Late 16th/early 17th century ‘Facon de Venise’ wine glass with a lion mask moulded stem, found during this year's training dig.
Late 16th/early 17th century ‘Facon de Venise’ wine glass with a lion mask moulded stem, found during this year’s training dig.

Since 2007, second-year students from the University of Chester, along with archaeologists from Cheshire West and Chester Council Cultural Services have undertaken a training excavation in Chester’s Grosvenor Park.

Since the project began the students have uncovered a Roman road that probably led to the east entrance of the amphitheatre that lay outside the Roman fortress. They have also found traces of timber-framing believed to be from Cholmondeley’s Mansion which was destroyed during the Civil War, and a medieval building relating to St John’s Church, which could have been part of the hospital and chapel of St Anne acquired by Sir Hugh Cholmondeley in the late 16th century and incorporated into his mansion.

The training dig is a joint project between our Cultural Service archaeologists and the University of Chester and is an important part of the students’ degree course.